For years, an Alabama farmer anonymously paid for the townspeople’s recipes

An Alabama farmer spent some of what little money he had to help members of his community pay their medical bills.

Not even Hody Childress’ family members knew of his generosity until shortly before his death at the age of 80 on January 1.

The revelation about his actions was first revealed to many at his funeral on January 5, after the town’s pharmacist told family members.

Childress’ daughter, Tania Nix, told the Washington Post she doesn’t know what made her father go to Geraldine Drugs in Geraldine, Alabama, a town of about 900 people, every month and give the pharmacist $100 to help those affected.

Nix speculated that her medical bills and medications were expensive when her mother was battling multiple sclerosis. Her mother, Peggy, died in 1999. He began his altruistic tradition in 2012.

Tania Nix pictured with her late father Hody Childress. Nix says she had no idea of ​​his lavish deeds until shortly before his death

This is Geraldine Drugs in the town of Geraldine, Alabama, where Childress donated $100 each month to help those in need

This is Geraldine Drugs in the town of Geraldine, Alabama, where Childress donated $100 each month to help those in need

Nix said a woman recently wrote to her that Childress’ money could buy her an EpiPen for her son and pay for the prescription for her and her daughter.

Drugstore pharmacist Brooke Walker said Childress told her when he first handed over the money: “Don’t tell a soul where the money came from – if they ask, just tell them it’s a blessing from the Lord.” ”

Walker is a pharmacist and manager at Geraldine Drugs. In a separate interview with WVTM, she said, “Every month, year after year, he would go to the drug store and give me $100.”

The pharmacist continued: “I kept my word not to tell anyone, not even family. Eventually I started taking a little money here, a little money there just to help people who were struggling. She went on to describe him as “friendly” and “humble.”

Walker went so far as to tell the station that there were people in Geraldine who were living longer because of Childress’ actions.

Taking to Facebook, Walker shared the Washington Post story about Childress, writing, “Gosh β€” I can’t imagine Hody thinking about all this publicity.”

Childress was an Air Force veteran who later worked as a product manager for Lockheed Martin

Childress was an Air Force veteran who later worked as a product manager for Lockheed Martin

Childress' tractor, which his daughter described as a therapy tool for him, bears his name

Childress’ tractor, which his daughter described as a therapy tool for him, bears his name

Nix told WaPo that her father shared his donations when he became critically ill with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease over the holiday season

Nix told WaPo that her father shared his donations when he became critically ill with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease over the holiday season

Childress's first wife, Peggy, died in 1999, he is pictured here with his second wife, Martha Jo, who passed away in 2022

Childress’s first wife, Peggy, died in 1999, he is pictured here with his second wife, Martha Jo, who passed away in 2022

The pharmacist told a family member that she did not authorize Childress’s donation for painkillers, only antibiotics and life-sustaining drugs.

On two occasions she used the money for non-medical reasons, once to help a woman who was in an abusive relationship get back on her feet and once to help an elderly man caring for his disabled son and wife who broke her hip to pay for a used washer and dryer.

Nix told WaPo that her father shared his donations when he became critically ill with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease over the holiday season.

She said: ‘He told me he carried a $100 bill to the chemist in Geraldine every first month and he didn’t want to know who she helped with it – he just wanted to bless the people with it.’

WVTM reports that Childress asked Nix to deliver his $100 routine as he was unable to due to illness.

Nix went on to say that her father was not a wealthy man, an Air Force veteran who achieved the rank of Airman Third Class and worked as a product manager for defense contractor Lockheed Martin in Huntsville before retiring.

Despite his day job, Nix said her father’s passion was farming. She described his time on his tractor as “his therapy.” Nix added, “He spent a lot of time helping neighbors plant their gardens.”

She continued, “Every time he went to the post office, he would bring the postmaster an apple or some yams, squash, or okra that he had grown on his farm.”

Nix spoke about his generosity, saying that when she goes out to dinner with her father, you have to grab the check first or he’ll make sure to pay.

His kind nature wasn’t limited to gifts, Nix said that towards the end of her mother’s life, Childress would carry her up the bleachers to watch Friday night high school ballgames.

A year later, after the death of his wife, Childress remarried to a woman named Martha Jo, who was also unaware of his drugstore generosity. She died in March 2022.

Nix introduced herself with her stepmother, who was unaware of the generosity of Childress and her father

Nix introduced herself with her stepmother, who was unaware of the generosity of Childress and her father

Tragedy struck the family in 1973 when Childress’s son and father were killed in a tornado.

A news report from the time states that the couple were killed when their house was lifted from its foundation by the Twister.

A neighbor told the Associated Press at the time that he was among the first to arrive after the storm and found Childress holding his son’s body. His mother was found unconscious among the rubble but survived.

Another neighbor told the AP: “[Childress] was covered in mud and blood. He said his house was flown away and he couldn’t find his mother and father and he didn’t know how he got out of the house alive.

Nix told the Post: “It was really tough for him but he never complained. He never lost his optimism.’

She went on to tell the newspaper, “I’ve heard from people who said they were going through a tough time and their prescriptions were paid for when they picked them up.”

The hairdresser added: “She wrote to me and said she never knew who helped her until my father died. She said it was a tremendous relief as a mother and she couldn’t thank my father enough.

While pharmacist Brooke Walker said: “His kindness motivated me to be a more compassionate person. He was just a good old fellow who wanted to bless his church, and he certainly did. He left a legacy of kindness.”

Childress’ legacy continues as townsfolk establish the Hody Childress Fund to help community members with their pharmacy bills.

Nix said: “If what he did could touch a person and let them know there’s still good in the world, it’s worth it. That’s what my father would have wanted.”

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