The COVID-19 pandemic is driving doctors and nurses out of the healthcare system

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has placed a heavy strain on the health care system in the state of Alabama. Some doctors and nurses have been forced out of the profession and others are considering doing the same. says Dr. Wes Stubblefield of the Alabama Department of Public Health. Emergency rooms were at times exhausted with sick patients. Not just people with COVID-19, but also people with other issues like strokes and car accidents. In addition to the large crowds, personal protective equipment providers are also having to adapt. “You know, Alabama’s healthcare system is already strained,” Stubblefield explains. “We have seen many rural hospitals closed. We’re barely making it with the beds we have and then you’ve factored in the liquid COVID and it continues to reduce the number of beds available.” which is not always a guarantee as it used to be. “I think we’re going to be dealing with COVID for a long time,” says Dr. Don Williamson, President of the Alabama Hospital Association. “I think it’s just going to be one more pathogen now. We need to get our vaccination every year or however often. Get your influenza shot, get your COVID shot. Get them the same day and move on.” A recent survey by Elsevier Health found that 47 percent of healthcare workers nationwide plan to leave their current positions by 2025 unless changes are made. This leaves some uncertainty about the healthcare system.

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has placed a heavy strain on the health care system in the state of Alabama. Some doctors and nurses have been forced out of the profession, others are considering doing the same.

“It took a toll on people, particularly those caring for very sick patients with COVID-19, as they continued to come in,” says Dr. Wes Stubblefield of the Alabama Department of Public Health.

Emergency rooms were at times exhausted with sick patients. Not just people with COVID-19, but also people with other issues like strokes and car accidents. In addition to the large crowd, providers of personal protective equipment also have to adapt.

“You know, Alabama’s healthcare system is already strained,” Stubblefield explains. “We have seen many rural hospitals closed. We’re barely making it with the beds we have and then you factored in the liquid COVID and it just keeps reducing the number of beds available.”

Doctors stress that a hospital bed is only usable if there is someone to occupy it, which isn’t always a guarantee like it used to be.

“I think we’re going to be dealing with COVID for a long time,” says Dr. Don Williamson, President of the Alabama Hospital Association. “I think it’s just going to be one more pathogen now. We need to get our vaccination every year or however often. Get your influenza shot, get your COVID shot. Get them the same day and move on.”

A recent survey by Elsevier Health found that 47 percent of healthcare workers across the country plan to leave their current positions by 2025 unless changes are made. This leaves some uncertainty about the healthcare system.

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